You, Me and Teddy

Parenting adventures and activities in and around Neuchâtel, Switzerland.


4 Comments

Introducing New Foods

I like offal: liver, kidney, sweetbreads. I am big on seafood as well including whelks and winkles. Scottish black pudding beats English black pudding hands down and Haggis is delicious.

I was brought up on “interesting” cuts of meat none of which I considered odd until I reached secondary school at 11 and people started eeeeeeeeeewing everything. Then I turned veggie for a while but that’s another story.

Unfortunately hubby is a little less adventurous than me. I mean he’ll try everything, which I applaud, but we have had a few, albeit rare, dashes to the bin for things he considers too revolting. There aren’t many things I haven’t been able to stomach in life; I can list them all on a couple fingers:

  • Jellyfish – It was just like eating rubber and I couldn’t figure out how to take a bite or even swallow it.
  • Tripe – I reckon I’ll try it again at some point but cooked in a clear broth was just too much texture for me on a first try.

I haven’t had to try many insects yet. I’ve eaten ants (in chocolate) but I don’t know how I would react to deep fried locust for example. I’d like to think I’d give them a go. I know a lot of it is mental and perception can definitely influence how we taste things but its hard to override your brain.

Fried crickets

Fried crickets

Now, I’m not saying you should like everything. I don’t really like onion, for example, and frogs legs can hop on. But its all about being open to new flavours. Did you know that children may need to be offered a new food as many as 10-15 times before they will eat it?

Probably, like a lots of things, there are tastes best acquired at a young age. One study showed that repeated taste exposure can increase liking for certain food products in young children.

This is why I am on a mission to introduce my kids to as many flavours as I can before they learn from their peers that somethings “shouldn’t” be eaten.

This week we had tongue. Ox tongue cooked in broth with carrots, celery, onions and boiled potatoes is one of my favorite childhood dishes. It is super easy to cook: Firstly you clean the tongue thoroughly and then you pop it in a large pot. Chop up 3 to 4 carrots in to batons, 3 sticks of celery into batons, one onion into chunks. Add all the veg to the pot with the celery leaves, 6 peppercorns and a bay leaf and then just cover all with some stock. Then you cook the tongue until the skin can be peeled off easily. This can take a few hours so I tend to pop it on at low temperature when I go out for the afternoon. While I am peeling the tongue I add my potatoes to cook in the stock. Then I slice the tongue and re add it to the broth to warm it before serving.

Tongue has an acquired texture but it has a great taste plus it is really easy for the kids to eat. I was determined that the kids would like it, and not snub it like their Dad, so I pulled out the big guns: the paint palate plates that I’ve shown you before. The trick is to make it as colourful as possible to make it more appealing!

tongue

Success! The plates were spotless and no complaints. M even had second servings of tongue.

What foods do you eat that others might consider odd? How adventurous are you with new flavours?

 


2 Comments

The Apples Are Ready!

Today while I was attempting to tame the garden, and prevent my little boy from eating the rotten apples under the tree, I noticed that they were finally ripe as the healthy ones were starting to drop.

I quickly scooped up a bowl and with the help of E picked the remaining apples off the tree. I reckon we have about 5 kilos in total so not amazing but certainly good enough to do some baking. I have no idea what sort of apples they are but have a pinkish tinge and they turn to purée when cooked. I believe they are something related to a Duchess of Oldenburg apple thanks to this very useful website called the Orange Pippin but I’m no expert.

apples

This week I saw a brilliantly easy Apple and Sage Sausage Roll recipe posted by The Peachicks Bakery, a blog which specialises in dairy, soya and egg-free recipes. I do not have any need for specialist recipes but the lovely lady who runs it keeps her baking appealing to all. This recipe actually popped up on her Facebook page and I loved the idea so decided to give it a try with my new apples.

I adapted Midge’s recipe slightly to our ingredients, for instance, the closest we can get to British sausages is a a Saucisse Vaudoise, but this comes rolled in a spiral as one extra long sausage.

Firstly I made my apple sauce by peeling and chopping my apples and placing them in a large saucepan with enough water to cover half. Then I cooked them on a medium heat until they were soft and pureed. If your apples remain firm you could always puree them in a blender but it is nice to leave a little bit of texture in my opinion.

Sausage rolls
Ingredients
  •  2 Saucisses Vaudoises (or any sausage/sausage meat you like)
  • 10 sage leaves
  • 1 cup apple sauce
  • 1 roll of puff pastry
  • 1 beaten egg
sausage rolls
Instructions
  • Preheat oven to 220°C (200°C fan oven).
  • Firstly lay out your pastry and up it in half lengthways down the middle so you have two long strips.
  • Then spread the apple sauce on the pastry.
  • Tear the sage leaves and sprinkle on top.
  • Place the sausages on the pastry and roll them up into long rolls. Press the join together with your fingers.
  • Cut the long rolls to desired lengths and lay out on a non-stick baking sheet.
  • Lightly brush with beaten egg.
  • Place in oven for 25-30 minutes.

The preparation was simple enough that E could help which she loves and we served them for dinner very simply with some green beans (and ketchup for the addicts). The kids wolfed them down and even came back for more.dinner

They were really delicious, fabulously easy and all I can really say is thank you very much to Midge at the Peachicks Bakery!


3 Comments

Eureka!

I did it! I managed to create a decent substitute to Heinz baked beans!

baked beans and spud side
After promising baked beans and spuds for dinner panic stations hit when I realised I was totally out of supplies.

Now E is a pretty stubborn creature and, while she is a good eater, trying to get her to agree to a dinner which isn’t pasta based (her current absolute “favourite food in the whole wide world”) can be tricky sometimes. I was over the moon when she said she’d happily have baked potatoes without any argument.

There was no time to get to the shops. M was napping and besides the potatoes were already in the oven. Hmmm… I would have to improvise.

Looking in my cupboard I discovered I had: tinned tomatoes. Check. And, yes, tinned cannellini beans. Hoorah!

So here is my recipe:

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 10 sage leaves
  • 2 cloves of garlic or 1/2 a teaspoon of dried garlic
  • 400g tinned tomatoes
  • 50ml water
  • 800g drained and rinsed tinned cannellini beans (you could also cook dried beans)
  • 2 small tablespoons of low salt & sugar ketchup

Instructions

  • Heat the oil and fry the crushed garlic on a low to medium heat.
  • Add the tomatoes and sage.
  • Heat through and add the water.
  • Blitz the lot with a hand held blender (my absolute favourite kitchen gadget) and bring to a simmer.
  • Add beans and the ketchup (to give some of that authentic “Heinz” taste) and heat through.

beans in pan

It wasn’t the real deal but it was similar enough not to cause a fuss. You could probably get closer in taste by adding more ketchup but I think it was much tastier as it was, not to mention more nutritious!

It was so quick and simple to make and I will certainly be doing this in future rather than buying the beans ready prepared.

kiddie beans

Hope you are all well and having better weather than we are here.


3 Comments

Diet Bake #2: Bakes with Fruit

For those of you who didn’t see my previous post I am currently compiling a list of recipes that won’t completely sabotage my diet and allow me and my daughter to carry on enjoying baking. While there are many diet bakes out there I am trying to find healthier recipes rather those that simply substitute ingredients like sugar with artificial sweeteners.

Diet Bake #2 Bakes with Fruit

This week I have been trying out recipes that use fruit for the sweetness rather than huge quantities of sugar.

My first recipe is a Baby Led Weaning one I’ve adapted. This Banana Bread basically gets all of its sweetness from the bananas and sultanas and it is actually my hubby’s favourite.

Banana Bread

Ingredients

  • 100 g wholemeal self-raising flour (you can use plain flour but just add 2 teaspoons of baking powder)
  • ½ teaspoon mixed spice
  • 50 g butter
  • 75 g sultanas (or raisins)
  • 200g mashed bananas
  • 1 egg beaten

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C and lightly grease a 450g loaf tin.
  2. Sift the flour into a large bowl with the spices. Rub the butter into the flour or use a blender until the mixture looks like breadcrumbs.
  3. Stir in the sultanas and make a well in the centre of the flour mixture.
  4. In a separate bowl mash the bananas and add the egg.
  5. Pour the banana mixture into the flour mix and fold in.
  6. Put the mixture into mould and place the oven. Turn the oven down to 160°C and bake for 45 minutes to an hour. When it is done a skewer should come out clean when it is inserted.

For this bake I actually used 3 mini loaf tins instead and baked than for 25 minutes in a same temperature oven. This meant each loaf gave 6 slices (so 18 slices in total). I sometimes think choice of tin is everything. 2 smaller slices seem more satisfying to me than one big one and sometimes a small slice of a square bake can seem like more than one of a round cake. I guess it is like that experiment where they use highball glasses and tumblers to distort perception of quantity by Wansink, B. & van Ittersum, K. (2007). We are so easily fooled by optical illusions we might as well use it to our advantage.

With 18 slices 1 slice was 2 WeightWatchers points, while 2 slices was only 3 points (yay!) and this came to only 64 calories per slice!

N.B. These banana loaves also freeze really well.

Next I had to try out an apple recipe. You can’t do a fruit bake series without one but surprisingly trying to find a good recipe to work off was pretty tricky as they all tend to be laden with sugar and butter.

I eventually found a one but lowered some of the sugar quantities as I found them unnecessary Next time I might try lowering them further – it depends so much on the fruit you use.

Apple and Pear Cake

Apple Cake

Ingredients 

  • 3 ½ medium apples or pears (you can actually use any fruit e.g. peaches or plums)
  • Juice from one lemon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 230 g caster sugar
  • 125 g plain white flour
  • 1½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 120g butter
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 190°C and line a 20cm square tin (or 23cm round one)
  2. Peel, core and chop the apple and pears into slices and place in a bowl.
  3. Add the lemon juice, cinnamon and 30 g of sugar and leave the apple to sit.
  4. Sieve together the flour, baking powder, and salt.
  5. In another bowl or a mixer cream together the butter and 200g of the sugar and then add the eggs and vanilla.
  6. Add the flour mixture and beat until combined.
  7. Spread the mixture evenly in the prepared pan.
  8. Arrange the apple and pear slices on top and place in the oven for 45 minutes until an inserted skewer comes out clean.
  9. Cool in the tin on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.

This cake gives 12 slices at 6 WeightWatchers points a piece or 224 calories. Ok, it isn’t the lightest cake but its really yummy and it could be so much worse.

I love Mary Berry but her recipes are generally not very WeightWatchers friendly. She generally seems to use more fat in all of her recipes than anyone else. They are darn good though. You can understand my surprise though when reading through her book I came across one that looked like it might fit the bill. Here are Mary Berry’s Blueberry muffins.

Blueberries

Ingredients 

  • 250 g white self-raising flour
  • 1 level teaspoons of baking powder
  • 50 g butter
  • 75 g caster sugar
  • 175 g blueberries
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 large eggs
  • 250ml semi-skimmed milk 

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C and grease a muffin tin or place cases in a 12 hole muffin tin (I use silicon muffin trays so I don’t use cases)
  2. Measure the flour and baking powder into a large bowl and rub in the butter until it resembles breadcrumbs (you can do this in a blender).
  3. Stir in the sugar, zest and blueberries (don’t do this bit in the blender though or you will destroy your blueberries).
  4. Mix the eggs and milk and add it directly to the dry mixture the mixture and blend quickly.
  5. Spoon the mixture into the muffin cases (almost to the top).
  6. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the are well risen, firm and golden,
  7. Cool in the tray for a few minutes and then transfer to a wire rack and serve warm.

These muffins are suspiciously healthy at only 4 WeightWatchers points a piece or 157 calories.

I’m going to finish on a very healthy sounding one Banana Bran Muffins.

Banana Bran Muffins

Ingredients  

  • 115g butter
  • 100g brown sugar
  • 3 bananas, mashed
  • 115ml milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 eggs
  • 175g wholemeal flour
  • 100g wheat bran
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Instructions

    1. Preheat the oven to 190°C and grease a muffin tin or line with muffin cases.
    2. In a large mixing bowl or blender, cream the butter and brown sugar until fluffy.
    3. Add the bananas, milk, vanilla and eggs and mix well.
    4. Combine the flour, bran, baking powder, baking soda and salt and blend into the banana mixture.
    5. Pour the mixture into the muffin tray or cases.
    6. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the muffin comes out clean. Cool in the tray for five minutes then place on a wire rack to cool completely.

 

This mixture makes about 14 muffins. They are also only 4 WeightWatchers points a muffin or 212 calories but you could add a handful of chopped walnuts to the mix which would bring them up to 5 points or 276 calories a muffin.

With all of the banana recipes I find that if you can keep them a couple of days they just get stickier and yummier! So try to hold off a bit.

Wow, thats a lot of cake. Don’t worry we aren’t going to eat all the cakes ourselves we have the whole family including our 93 year old Granny coming to tea so hopefully they will all get eaten.

Happy baking!


2 Comments

The Pursuit of Beauty

Who doesn’t like to look good? It makes you feel great but why? Are we born like it or is it something society creates?

I do not see the desire to look attractive as something feminine as I know many men who also try to keep themselves in shape or groomed its just different terms for women: diet and made-up. Yes as females we tend to have a lot more socially acceptable options to groom ourselves: nails, hair removal, makeup… but men can also now have beauty treatments, go to hair salons rather than the barber,  or have plastic surgery. Men just don’t make such a big deal of it as trying to look good is often seen as unmanly.

There is the anti beauty side of things too: those who don’t want to look like models or pinups but then they also try to create a certain look that makes them feel good about how they dress; attractive to likeminded individuals. Wanting to look good isn’t about being sexually attractive but rather making anyone more disposed to liking you, be it friend, partner, client or even your boss.

My little girl has always wanted to wear my makeup – not to look good but rather because it looks like a fun toy. It is only recently that I think she has associated it with looking pretty. I wonder if I am to blame for this. I do tell her she looks pretty, everyone does! She is a little blonde, blue-eyed, ringleted creature in a mainly dark-haired, brown-eyed population and so she stands out. If someone doesn’t comment on how she is dressed when she is wearing a new outfit she will stick her chest out at them until they notice and say how lovely it looks (to which she nods knowingly). Confidence isn’t really her issue on that point; E “knows” she looks good.

Her new favourite activity is to get her nails done. I rarely have my nails done but I decided to make a bit of an effort last year to get a bit more preened and went to visit a new salon in town that does the semi-permenant varnishes. I am so useless with my nails – hence I rarely have them done – the only thing that lasts over a few days is the “2 weeks” ones (and they only last about a week for me). During one of my trips I saw that in this new salon they do “princess” manicures. They have a special varnish for young children which is non-toxic and comes off in hot water. My hubby also likes to get his hands seen to from time to time as it stops him biting his nails if there is nothing left to bite. I suggested they E and him go together and see how they get along. E, at 2 years of age, was an angel for all of 40 minutes sitting perfectly still and taking the whole thing very seriously. Since that moment, as a special treat, we take her to get her nails done. 

Last week we went to see my friend in Montreux, who had her beautiful baby boy finally by the way, and as a special “new mummy” pampering session we all headed off to the nail bar. It was lovely being the three girls having our nails seen to and E loves to be a big girl.

nails

Here she is in her dinosaur sweater, having just bought a spiderman outfit to dress up in for carnival, and having her nails seen to.

It does bother me a little: I always wanted to make sure she didn’t end up too princessy. I do have a feminist side in that I want both sexes to be equal and have equal opportunities. Am I stunting her in giving her these girly moments? I don’t think so. I think if M wanted to have his nails done I would let him too. They have the same toys and both have their dolly days or car days. E’s dress up choices go from princess to doctor, dinosaur to mummy, wonderwoman to spiderman. I expect M’s will too. At the end of the day they just want to try everything that their parents do and its not necessarily associated with male or female roles yet (and I hope to keep it that way).

Back to the issue of looking good. When do I need to watch out for making my children worry about needing to look good? E certainly likes prettier things but M does already too (sometimes our perception of pretty does differs dramatically though). E has always had her own ideas on fashion too or how she wants her hair styled and has always done since I first started putting clips in her hair (she would wear one colour but not another). Konrad Lorenz studied bonding between humans and attractiveness as early as 1943. It also appears that children play with prettier toys for longer (Langlois, Roggman, & Reiser-Danner, 1990) and even very young children perceive better-looking teachers as more intelligent (Goebel & Cashen, 1979; Zebrowitz et al., 2002).  I’m tending towards innate here as it must be an evolutionary trait to want to look more attractive to others as we are generally survive best in groups.

It is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week this week. Like many I have suffered with eating problems in the past but I see myself as cured as I can be: I don’t think I look bad the whole time (I have moments like most people), I can follow a diet carefully without getting obsessed, and I don’t feel a compulsion towards certain food behaviours.  I know it is in there somewhere but so long as I pay attention everything is fine. My fear is that I will pass on my problem to my children as it often carries through families. I guess this is why I am sensitive about the looking good issue (as for me it is linked to eating disorders). Are my children disposed to taking the feeling of wanting to look good to the next obsessing level?

I guess we will have to take it as it comes, as parents we can never be perfect but we can try our best. I will try to remain relaxed about food and my appearance focusing on heathy eating without pressure. This is why we did BLW (baby led weaning) as it takes puts the control of eating in the hands of the child. I will try to make sure the children develop their own sense of how they want to look and try to make sure they know they look good the way they are. I will stop using gender specific terms of beauty. And finally I will try to stop staring at myself in the mirror in front of the children.

Do you have similar experiences? Do you worry that we live in a beauty-centric world? Do you agree with my conclusion that wanting to look attractive is innate? Please let me know.


4 Comments

Calling it quits

My little boy turns one tomorrow and I’m still breastfeeding.

birthday

He has been a struggle to breastfeed from day one: he slept the first 24 hours, waking to feed only briefly 3 times. However, he gained weight after the third day and fulfilled the minimum feeding requirements. I was told not to worry, your body is on automatic second time round, and that there is very little you can do wrong; “all will be fine”.

My daughter just fed and fed from the word go. She would latch on and stay put. E woke every two hours for a feed till she was 4 months. It was a miracle when at 6 months she slept 6 hours straight! M was already basically sleeping a full night by then. He never woke to feed and while my initial milk supply was great it soon started to dwindle.

When we weaned at 6 months we did baby led weaning (BLW). This meant we went at his rhythm giving him the same as us minus any salt. M didn’t start slow like his sister but tried to eat full meals immediately. He has always had great hand eye coordination and so it wasn’t much of an issue apart from the fact M decided he didn’t really want the milk anymore.

I felt like I was forcing the milk on him and then he decided to make things even more difficult: he would only eat in a lying down position in a darkened room. Ok, I know I shouldn’t have put up with it but I was so worried about him not feeding I didn’t want to push my luck.

The paediatrician seemed happy with him at his 9 month check and just told me to make sure he was getting his calcium through other sources. Up to then I had been pumping like crazy to maintain supply and also to give him some milk for his time at crèche.

Both my kids do some time in daycare despite me being a stay at home mum. We have a few good reasons for this:

  1. This is how we fought the jealousy aspect with my daughter. Giving her a day with mummy suddenly stopped the tantrums and nasty behaviour towards her brother. I also love having the one on one time with both kids.
  2. It gives our children the opportunity to play with their peers. There aren’t really that many activities you can do with your children where they can play with other kids here. Being a stay at home mum is pretty rare (most mums work at least part time) meaning most kids are in crèche so there isn’t a big enough demand for lots of play groups.
  3. Crèche is where our children speak French. We have a strict English only house as is often the case with those trying to keep their mother tongue pure in a foreign speaking country. Establishing these zones will hopefully mean that our children will muddle their languages less and get a real foot in anglophone culture before they start full time school and get froggied.

So, to up his calcium, I started introducing baby yoghurts and then some formula.

Tomorrow as he turns one M is in theory fully weaned and can have cows’ milk. I should be proud of getting to a year but actually I feel sad and disappointed. I fed E up to 16 months and it felt natural to stop. With M I feel like I’ve been probably forcing it for a while but I haven’t done the same for him that I did for his sister (like with so many other things). Its like I’ve let him down and thus let myself down.

Doubts enter my head: maybe it’s because he took a bottle straight away (E only took one at 10 months); maybe it’s because we offered a bottle too early; maybe I didn’t feed him enough in the first few days… On the other hand my logical side is telling me that I’ve done great. I don’t frown on anyone who has stopped after two weeks deciding its not for them so why am I giving myself a tough time?

I’m totally ready to stop and yet not. I’d love to see out the winter but then I’m really not producing enough anymore for my growing boy. I put him down tonight with yet another struggle to give him any breast milk with the intention that that was my last feed.

Have any of you had such different children leading to similar parenting dilemmas?


Leave a comment

P-P-P-Pizza!

Its oh so easy to just buy a pizza ready-made and pop it in the oven (or even easier to pick up the phone) but actually they are pretty simple to make from scratch. Here is my lazy guide to pizza making that even the kids can do.

Ok, so there is a little bit of work involved: You have to buy the ingredients at the shop and make the recipes at some point. This does involves some kneading by hand (if you don’t have a kneading attachment on your mixer). Kneading is a great workout though and can help release a lot of built up tension.

Here is my pizza dough recipe adapted from Jamie Oliver:pizza dough

Ingredients
  • 1 kg white bread flour or Tipo ’00’ flour, or 800g strong white bread flour
  • 1 tsp fine sea salt
  • 2 x 7 g dried yeast sachet
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar
  • 4 tsbp extra virgin olive oil
  • 650 ml lukewarm water
  • semolina flour for dusting (you can use normal flour but I prefer semolina)

Method

Sieve the flour and salt on to a clean work surface (or into your mixer with kneading attachment if you have one) and make a well in the middle. In a jug, mix the yeast, sugar and olive oil into the water and leave for a few minutes, then pour into the well. Using a fork, bring the flour in gradually from the sides and swirl it into the liquid. Keep mixing, drawing larger amounts of flour in, and when it all starts to come together, work the rest of the flour in with your clean, flour-dusted hands. Knead until you have a smooth, springy dough.

Place the ball of dough in a large flour-dusted bowl and flour the top of it. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and place in a warm room for about an hour until the dough has doubled in size.

Now remove the dough to a flour-dusted surface and knead it around a bit to push the air out with your hands – this is called knocking back the dough. You can either use it immediately, or keep it, wrapped in clingfilm, in the fridge (or freezer) until required. If using straight away, divide the dough up into as many little balls as you want to make pizzas – this amount of dough is enough to make about eight pizzas but I roll thinly.

I tend to make this and freeze 2 thirds as 1 third is enough for us as a family. If you freeze it into pizza size portions it is easier later.

When I know I want to make pizzas I just pop a couple of portions in the fridge the night before and it is perfect the next day and ready to roll. (That’s the lazy bit as I don’t actually have to make the dough when I want to make pizza).

I roll them out just before we are going to eat on to semolina flour as it gives it that nice slightly grainy base. I don’t really throw my pizza about much as I tend to lose it to the floor but feel free.

The next stage is the tomato sauce. Here is the perfect pizza sauce recipe and so easy to do. This is also a staple I have in the freezer pre-portioned and I take it out to defrost with the pizza dough the night before:

Pizza prep

Even Teddy helped

Ingredients

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1kg tinned chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp tomato purée
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper

Method

Cook down onions until they are soft and then add the garlic. After one minute add the other ingredients (except the salt and pepper which you add right at the end to taste) and simmer for an hour. The sauce will be nice and thick and relatively chunky at the end but you can purée it if you are less lazy than me.

So this is why I said it was easy. For me it is a meal that doesn’t generally involve any cooking on the actual night: E loves to cook and the assembly is a task she can pretty much do alone. I supervise the rolling if we don’t want too many holes in our pizza bases but the rest is up to her. I like to promote independence in our children and even had her chopping button mushrooms from about 18 months (with her baby knife). I believe that there is no better way of learning than letting your toddler take part in everyday tasks. Of course there is a limit to how much you can bake (and actually consume) or what you can allow your child to clean without it becoming dangerous hence we do crafts too.

The great thing about pizzas is that you can put anything on them. Yesterday was fairly basic though as I had made a mushroom salad at lunch so that went on with some lardons left over from a quiche we made.  As for cheese we went classical again with Mozzarella and Parmesan.
The kids picking out which pizzas were theirs.

The kids picking out which pizzas were theirs.

They took about 20 minutes in a 220°C oven. If you can heat it from the bottom element only and preheat the baking trays this helps you to get the lift and air in the dough like in pizza-oven baked ones.
Calzone
We made two medium pizzas and one giant calzone. Please do give it a go as it really isn’t as daunting as it looks. Happy pizza making.
pizzas